SCHS Header
Link to Homepage
Link to About Us page
Link to Staff & Board page
Link to Ross Center page
Link to Exhibits page
Link to Events Calendar page
Link to Archives page
Link to Online Store
Link to Membership page
Link to Volunteer page
Link to Contact Us page
Historical photo show 100 years ago header


100 Years Ago


Agriculture
Black History
Canal
Civil War
Downtown
Education
Entertainment
Events
Gold Rush
Immigration
Indians
Industry
Landmarks
Law and Order
Organizations
People
Pioneers
Politics
Sports
Transportation
War
Women

Transportation

In the early years, pioneers came to Ohio by foot, wagon, horse or boat. Large freight wagons drawn by horses could be hired to transport belongings while the settler walked. Later, they could travel by steamboat to Ohio. The first steamboat on the Ohio was the New Orleans, in 1811. By 1823, there were 262 steamboats operating on the Ohio with a speed of 10 to 12 miles per hour. Even in 1850, Ohio River steamboats were a very popular mode of transportation, carrying 3,000,000 passengers in a year.

The canals came to Shelby County, Ohio, in the 1840s followed by the railroads in the mid 1850s. Henry Ford’s automobiles revolutionized travel in the 1900s.

The early roads in Shelby County will be found among those leading from Piqua to Wapakoneta, from Troy to Dingmansburg (East Sidney), from Dingmansburg to Wapakoneta, and from Piqua, or from the Piqua and Wapakoneta road to Hardin and St. Marys.

'Pioneer' segment written in October, 1997 by Sherrie Casad-Lodge

 

[ Back to Pioneer Index ]

Article Footer
SCHS footer Link to Home page Link to About Us Information Link to the Ross Center Information Link to our Events Calendar Information Link to our Archives Information Link to our Online Store / Products Information Link to our Membership Information Link to our Volunteering Information Link to our Contact Information Link to Staff & Board Information Link to our Current & Upcoming Exhibits Information Link to our Donation Information